What is Simulation? – Simulator Aided Inter Disciplinary Workshop

What is Simulation?

Simulation is a technique to replace or amplify real-patient experiences with guided experiences. Various types of simulators are used to train and assess different levels of learners. These include mannequin simulators, human cadaver or animal models, computer-based simulation, haptic and/or virtual simulation, as well as simulation using standardized patients. Simulation has been an accepted part of training, assessment and research in high-reliability organizations, such as aviation, nuclear power, and military. Healthcare has adopted simulation from these fields for the purpose of training healthcare providers. Simulation-based learning has been used to shorten the gap that exists between the learning environment and the real clinical environment. Many skill trainers have been developed to actualize real clinical site especially for novice residents .

Utilization of simulatiors has many advantages for medical education:
1) learning can be focused on the level of trainees with various levels of difficulties;
2) learners can either learn the whole procedure process or just focus on certain tasks of the procedure;
3) learners have the opportunity to repetitively practice in quick succession;
4) learners learn in a safe environment where they can be allowed to learn from their mistakes rather than be rescued by their supervisor to keep the patient safe;
5) simulators can provide objective evidence of performance, offering potential for their use for assessment, both formative and summative;
6) simulation can provide practice on certain procedures such as cricothyrotomy, which is a critical life-saving procedure that is uncommon and rarely performed by residents.

Simulation has a potential to promote a new paradigm compared to traditional education tools. Technical skills and non-technical skills can be taught to residents via a standardized and organized simulation program teams.

Simulation based teaching workshop by the department of Anaesthesia and critical care was conducted on 7Th and 8th of Dec 2017.The whole programme had audio-video facilities.The whole process was beamed to the another class room in the Ist floor of the college building.

After the invocation, Dr, Sahajananda welcomed the gathering and the Guest faculty from Perth and Melbourne, Australia.
The guest faculty addressed the gathering and gave introductory lecture.

There were two case scenarios on 7th.
1.A pregnant patient with RTA having sustained chest and pelvic injuries. 16 participants were split into two groups and ask to conduct the management of the case.
2.Pregnant patient with severe PIH
After the procedure the defbreefing was done by the faculty namely: Parasad B Achar and Sunanda Gargeswari,in the ist floor class room. Detailed discussions were also held.
On 8th Dec 2017:

Dr. Sahajanand welcomed the gathering and delegates.He also introduced the guest faculty Dr.Shashikanth Manikappa from Melbourne.
Delegates were split into two batches.There were two case scenarios:
Patient with sepsis and septic shock
Patient in the OT who developed Anaphylaxix.

After the procedure the defbreefing was done by the faculty namely: Dr. Shashikanth and Sahajananda H, in the Ist floor class room. Detailed discussions were also held.

The whole programme was well attended by the residents and faculty from Surgery, Orthopedics, OBG, General Medicine and Pulmonary medicine.

 

Date : 7th Dec 2017 and 8th Dec 2017

Time : 2:00 pm to 6:00 pm

Venue : College first floor lecture hall & Kadamba Auditorium (College auditorium)

Speaker : Dr B. G. Prasad Achar & Ms Sunanda Achar, Melbourne, Australia

Worlds Breastfeeding Week – RRMCH Bangalore

RRMCH, Department of Pediatrics celebrated the “Worlds Breast Feeding Week” from 1st Aug 2017 to 7th Aug 2017.

World breast feeding week 2017 has been observed in department, under the guidance of Dr. Adarsh, Prof and HOD, Department of pediatrics RRMCH. We also celebrated one year anniversary of our Human Milk Bank.

Worlds Breast Feeding Week

1st August 2017 we had inauguration of world breastfeeding week in pediatric OPD at 11am. Started with lighting of the lamp from Dr. Govindaraju, Medical Superintendent, Dr. Adarsh, prof and HOD of pediatrics, Dr. R.Prema, Professor of Pediatrics, Dr. Shashikala, Prof and HOD of community medicine, Dr. Nagarathanna ,Prof and HOD of OBG, RRMCH.

02nd August 2017, we went to the community camp in rural health training centre in Chunchunkuppe. We organized programme for the breastfeeding mother in our community health centre. We shared the thoughts with mothers regarding breastfeeding and importance of it, Dr. Sahana Associate Professor and Dr. Yashitha Junior Resident, narrated about the theme “A Sustaining breastfeeding together” to the mothers.

03rd of august 2017 we conducted the quiz competition regarding the breast feeding for postgraduates of pediatrics, OBG,P&SM and medical students of our college, there was tough competition between all 5teams, and the winners were Dr. Vidhi and Dr. Apoorva from department of pediatrics.

4th August 2017, we had collage competition regarding the breastfeeding for medical students and nursing students, Out of 5 teams participated in the competition nursing students were emerged as winner.

5th August 2017, we oriented the mothers in PNC regarding the importance of Breastfeeding. We also narrated about the theme “A Sustaining breastfeeding together” to the mothers. Our breastfeeding counselor S/n Thayimudamma demonstrated the techniques of breast feeding and had interaction session.

7th August 2017 the breastfeeding awareness skit was presented by 3 groups from community medicine, 7th term medical Students and Nursing Students participated.
We conclude the programme, World breastfeeding week 2017 with great success.

We celebrated ORS day on 29 July 2017, programme was conducted in our OPD and pediatric wards to highlight the importance of Oral Rehydration Salts (ORS) and its significance in the treatment of dehydration.

Excessive loss of fluids and electrolytes in the body causes dehydration. Conditions like vomiting, diarrhea, and diseases which cause diarrhea such as bacterial or viral infection, cholera, food poisoning, unhygienic feeding practices can increase the chances of dehydration.

Dr. Adarsh, Prof and HOD had inaugurated the programme. We created the awareness programme in parents and distributed the ORS to the children.

This programme helped the parents to know more about dehydration difficulties and how to prevent the problem.

We gave a demo on How to make the ORS drink which is available in powder form?

1.Put the contents of the ORS packet in a clean container. Check the packet for directions and add the amount of clean water as indicated. Too little water could make the diarrhea worse.

2.Add water only. Do not add ORS to milk, soup, fruit juice or any soft drinks. Do not add sugar.

3.Stir well, and feed it to the child from a clean cup. Do not use a bottle.

ORS Day

ORS Day is celebrated every year on 29th July to highlight the importance of Oral Rehydration Salts (ORS) as a cost-effective method of health intervention. Acute diarrhoeal diseases are one of the leading causes of mortality in infants and young children in many developing countries. According to WHO, Diarrhoeal disease is the second leading cause of death in children under five years old. Diarrhoea, which is frequently caused by poor sanitation and hygiene, can have serious, even deadly results, typically as a result of diarrhoea-related dehydration. It particularly affects infants, children and old people. Diarrhoea generally lasts for several days, and leaves the body without water and salts that are necessary for survival. Most people who die from diarrhoea actually die from severe dehydration and fluid loss from the body.

Dehydration from diarrhoea can be prevented by giving extra fluids at home, or it can be treated simply and effectively by giving adequate glucose-electrolyte solution called Oral Rehydration Salts (ORS) solution. ORS Jodi (ORS and Zinc) has proven to be successful in the prevention and management of acute diarrhoea and dehydration. Oral rehydration salts contain a variety of salts (electrolytes) and sugar. The combination of electrolytes and sugar stimulates water and electrolyte absorption from the gut. It therefore prevents or reverses dehydration and replaces lost salts in conditions such as diarrhoea and vomiting.ORS is available in the market in a powder form in sachets/ readymade solutions or one can also easily make it at home as well.

All we need to know:
How to make the ORS drink which is available in powder form?

4.Put the contents of the ORS packet in a clean container. Check the packet for directions and add the amount of clean water as indicated. Too little water could make the diarrhea worse.

5.Add water only. Do not add ORS to milk, soup, fruit juice or any soft drinks. Do not add sugar.

6.Stir well, and feed it to the child from a clean cup. Do not use a bottle.

World Breastfeeding Week is an annual celebration which is being held every year from 1to 7 August in many countries all over the world and since past three years ADK Hospital has continued the celebration of this week. World Breastfeeding week is celebrated with the goal to promote exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life which gives tremendous benefits to baby as well as to the mother.

The World Health Organization (WHO), American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life and then supplemented breastfeeding up to two years or more.

Theme for World Breastfeeding Week 2016 is “A Key to Sustainable Development”, which is focusing on the importance of breastfeeding and promote breastfeeding as key element in getting us to think about how to value our wellbeing from the start of life, how to respect each other and care for the world we share.

Below are the activities initiated by nurses in ADK Hospital for celebrating world breastfeeding week 2016.

  • Breastfeeding refresher workshop for nurses- 1st – 2nd August
  • Visit postnatal inpatients for breastfeeding counseling – 1st – 7th August
  • Display posters & breastfeeding week theme at Information Counter- 1st – 7th August
  • Inauguration of breastfeeding booklet & leaflet – 2nd August
  • Visit postnatal mothers who are planned to get discharged from hospital to give breastfeeding counseling – 3rd August
  • Breastfeeding quiz between inter-nursing units – 4th August
  • Session on breastfeeding for antenatal, postnatal mothers & for ADK staff – 6th August
  • Breastfeeding committee launching – 7th August

Department of Paediatrics at RRMCH ,Well equipped department with skilled pediatrician teaching staff and state of the art ICU care

Inauguaration of Rajarajeswari Centre For Diabeties in Children

Center for Diabetes in Children was inaugurated at the pediatric OPD block of RRMCH on 8/9/17. This centre caters to all children with diabetes with a multidisciplinary approach. This centre provides free insulin, glucometer and glucometer strips on a regular basis for underprivileged children with TIDM. It gives an opportunity to monitor the compliance to medication for all children. The centre also impacts education towards management of diabetes along with nutritional advice. This is a part of the project named “Changing Diabetes in Children” which is a global initiative. The centre at RRMCH is named as Rajarajeswari’s centre for Diatbetes in Children (RCDIC) which will be coordinated by Dr. R.Prema.

The Chairman A.C. Shanmugam has not left any stone unturned in providing services to the poor and needy and this adds another feather to his cap. Similarly last year Human Milk Bank, the first of its kind in Karnataka was opened to cater the needs of neonates till the mothers can recover enough milk.
To commemorate the opening of this centre, Department of Pediatrics, RRMCH, has organized a CME on changing diabetes in children helping all doctors understand the detailed and latest management of such children. Also an elaborate nutritional exhibition which throws much light and knowledge on nutritional aspects of TIDM including carbohydrate counts and glycemic index which is apt for today’s modern children’s lifestyle was displayed. This impacted practical knowledge of eating the right food. During CME our chairman Sri A.C. Shanmugham has promised to provide infrastructure and investigations including treatment for underprivileged children with Type 1 diabetes in pediatric ward.

The program was huge success with more than 200 doctors attending and the awareness of nutrition imbibed by them.

Dr. Adarsh E
Prof and HOD
Department of Pediatrics RRMCH

The Technique of Knocking Out Genes – A Sneak Peek

Knocking out genes is a technique which researchers and scientists use when the want to find out
which gene is responsible for production of which protein. In a human body there are around 20,500 different genes that each gene is responsible for making a protein because they are known to be the building blocks for different components of the body be it muscles or bones or brain and more. Apparently, our body is made up proteins. Every gene is responsible for producing a different type of protein and the knocking out technique only helps scientists figure out who is responsible for what.

The Technique of Knocking Out Genes - A Sneak Peek

Knocking out a Gene
The scientists first find out genes with some serious mutation or mistake or create one if needed. These genes are dud genes and do not contribute a bit in production of protein. Now, this gene is injected into the DNA of a healthy cell. The scientists attach a tag called reporter gene to it for identification purpose of whether they have been accepted by the cell. Another identification of reporter genes is that the proteins they produce often glow in blue or green. The scientists apparently fool the DNA in a way. A DNA a we know is made up of long strand of genes and these genes can get damaged but the DNA has an inbuilt mechanism to fix the issue. With the help of a cellular tool box the scientist insert the knocked out gene into the DNA. They do this very smartly by making it look like a perfect copy of the surrounding gene that is to be replaced in that DNA. This disguise of sorts fold the DNA repair system and its swaps the dud gene for the old healthy gene, thus knocking out the original gene.

Some times scientists do not have to swap the gene fully. They can simply insert the reporter gene into the DNA they wish to get rid of, randomly. Now, the reporter gene is wedged in the middle of the old gene. Now, there is an all new piece of DNA inside and if a cell goes to read the gene, the instructions would not make sense to the cell due to its presence there. It would not use the gene to make a protein.

The scientist keep a watch on the process. They observe the working in case it is yeast or bacterium but if it is an embryo, scientists observe on how the animal or plant growth differs from other normal ones.
Today, scientists use different techniques to knock out the genes of any organism they want to. It could be mice or bacteria or for that matter even plants that have knocked out genes. Well, scientists today can knock out even human cells growing in the labs.

Rajarajeswari Medical College and Hospital – MOTTO: Availability of medical facilities is of utmost importance. We aim to serve the healthcare requirements needs to the medically unreached population. Through this, we provide quality medical, paramedical, nursing and allied healthcare education, excellent and compassionate hospital services with state of the art facilities as well as to carry out health research for the betterment of the humankind in tune with the holistic values of the institution.

*source from the internet

Hopes on for Vaccines Offering Lifelong Protection against Flu

Vaccines Offering Lifelong Protection against Flu-

Flu as we all know is a common condition that all of us encounter many a times during our stay on the earth or say our life span. You would rarely find a human who has not been a victim of this health condition. But, there is some good news around this condition. A recent study of a new vaccine containing ancestral flue virus genes is a ray of hope for researchers in the direction of life long protection against flu.

The vaccine was tested on mice and gave 100 percent results. The vaccine was so effective that even after being given nine different flu virus dozes of lethal nature they survived. The best part was they didn’t even fall sick.
Comparatively those mice that were given the traditional shots of flu did fall sick after these lethal doses were given to them and even died. Though, the study is primarily conducted on mice and it would be too early to say how it worked on humans, there is definitely a ray of hope. The hope that one day a universal flu vaccine is developed that would provide long term rather life long protection against flu viruses.

Though even after trying out the researchers still haven’t really succeeded in creating a vaccine that could offer life long protection because of the reason that flu viruses mutate fast. A recent study though used a different approach. The vaccine they created had ancestral and consensus flu genes from four main strain types namely H1 to H5. The delivery of these genes was done using adenovirus, the one responsible for causing common cold but an altered version of it that was harmless and had the ability to carry ancestral genes.

The results as mentioned were affirmative as these mice survived heavy doses of H1N1, H3N1, H3N2 and H5N1 which can easily kill the mice. Apparently 100% of the vaccinated mice survived.

Well, its too early to confirm the success but further study on different animals will certainly help the researchers determine the efficacy of the vaccine in terms of long term protection.

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