What is Simulation? – Simulator Aided Inter Disciplinary Workshop

What is Simulation?

Simulation is a technique to replace or amplify real-patient experiences with guided experiences. Various types of simulators are used to train and assess different levels of learners. These include mannequin simulators, human cadaver or animal models, computer-based simulation, haptic and/or virtual simulation, as well as simulation using standardized patients. Simulation has been an accepted part of training, assessment and research in high-reliability organizations, such as aviation, nuclear power, and military. Healthcare has adopted simulation from these fields for the purpose of training healthcare providers. Simulation-based learning has been used to shorten the gap that exists between the learning environment and the real clinical environment. Many skill trainers have been developed to actualize real clinical site especially for novice residents .

Utilization of simulatiors has many advantages for medical education:
1) learning can be focused on the level of trainees with various levels of difficulties;
2) learners can either learn the whole procedure process or just focus on certain tasks of the procedure;
3) learners have the opportunity to repetitively practice in quick succession;
4) learners learn in a safe environment where they can be allowed to learn from their mistakes rather than be rescued by their supervisor to keep the patient safe;
5) simulators can provide objective evidence of performance, offering potential for their use for assessment, both formative and summative;
6) simulation can provide practice on certain procedures such as cricothyrotomy, which is a critical life-saving procedure that is uncommon and rarely performed by residents.

Simulation has a potential to promote a new paradigm compared to traditional education tools. Technical skills and non-technical skills can be taught to residents via a standardized and organized simulation program teams.

Simulation based teaching workshop by the department of Anaesthesia and critical care was conducted on 7Th and 8th of Dec 2017.The whole programme had audio-video facilities.The whole process was beamed to the another class room in the Ist floor of the college building.

After the invocation, Dr, Sahajananda welcomed the gathering and the Guest faculty from Perth and Melbourne, Australia.
The guest faculty addressed the gathering and gave introductory lecture.

There were two case scenarios on 7th.
1.A pregnant patient with RTA having sustained chest and pelvic injuries. 16 participants were split into two groups and ask to conduct the management of the case.
2.Pregnant patient with severe PIH
After the procedure the defbreefing was done by the faculty namely: Parasad B Achar and Sunanda Gargeswari,in the ist floor class room. Detailed discussions were also held.
On 8th Dec 2017:

Dr. Sahajanand welcomed the gathering and delegates.He also introduced the guest faculty Dr.Shashikanth Manikappa from Melbourne.
Delegates were split into two batches.There were two case scenarios:
Patient with sepsis and septic shock
Patient in the OT who developed Anaphylaxix.

After the procedure the defbreefing was done by the faculty namely: Dr. Shashikanth and Sahajananda H, in the Ist floor class room. Detailed discussions were also held.

The whole programme was well attended by the residents and faculty from Surgery, Orthopedics, OBG, General Medicine and Pulmonary medicine.

 

Date : 7th Dec 2017 and 8th Dec 2017

Time : 2:00 pm to 6:00 pm

Venue : College first floor lecture hall & Kadamba Auditorium (College auditorium)

Speaker : Dr B. G. Prasad Achar & Ms Sunanda Achar, Melbourne, Australia

The Technique of Knocking Out Genes – A Sneak Peek

Knocking out genes is a technique which researchers and scientists use when the want to find out
which gene is responsible for production of which protein. In a human body there are around 20,500 different genes that each gene is responsible for making a protein because they are known to be the building blocks for different components of the body be it muscles or bones or brain and more. Apparently, our body is made up proteins. Every gene is responsible for producing a different type of protein and the knocking out technique only helps scientists figure out who is responsible for what.

The Technique of Knocking Out Genes - A Sneak Peek

Knocking out a Gene
The scientists first find out genes with some serious mutation or mistake or create one if needed. These genes are dud genes and do not contribute a bit in production of protein. Now, this gene is injected into the DNA of a healthy cell. The scientists attach a tag called reporter gene to it for identification purpose of whether they have been accepted by the cell. Another identification of reporter genes is that the proteins they produce often glow in blue or green. The scientists apparently fool the DNA in a way. A DNA a we know is made up of long strand of genes and these genes can get damaged but the DNA has an inbuilt mechanism to fix the issue. With the help of a cellular tool box the scientist insert the knocked out gene into the DNA. They do this very smartly by making it look like a perfect copy of the surrounding gene that is to be replaced in that DNA. This disguise of sorts fold the DNA repair system and its swaps the dud gene for the old healthy gene, thus knocking out the original gene.

Some times scientists do not have to swap the gene fully. They can simply insert the reporter gene into the DNA they wish to get rid of, randomly. Now, the reporter gene is wedged in the middle of the old gene. Now, there is an all new piece of DNA inside and if a cell goes to read the gene, the instructions would not make sense to the cell due to its presence there. It would not use the gene to make a protein.

The scientist keep a watch on the process. They observe the working in case it is yeast or bacterium but if it is an embryo, scientists observe on how the animal or plant growth differs from other normal ones.
Today, scientists use different techniques to knock out the genes of any organism they want to. It could be mice or bacteria or for that matter even plants that have knocked out genes. Well, scientists today can knock out even human cells growing in the labs.

Rajarajeswari Medical College and Hospital – MOTTO: Availability of medical facilities is of utmost importance. We aim to serve the healthcare requirements needs to the medically unreached population. Through this, we provide quality medical, paramedical, nursing and allied healthcare education, excellent and compassionate hospital services with state of the art facilities as well as to carry out health research for the betterment of the humankind in tune with the holistic values of the institution.

*source from the internet